Sustainable Pace

March 11th, 2018

Thinking, Fast And Slow (Daniel Kahneman, 2011)

This book was referenced in so many other stuff I was reading, so I finally bought and read it. Fast and slow The premise of Kahneman's book is that there are two different modes of thinking: a faster, low-energy, intuitive mode, and a slower, high-energy, rational mode. The fast mode is best at basic cognitive stuff, like driving a car on an empty road and reading traffic signs, while the slow mode is essential for non-trivial stuff, like parallel parking or multiplying large numbers. The fast mode is generally used over the slow mode, simply because it consumes less energy. Fast mode being the default mode can be problematic because it easily leads to wrong conclusions, a popular example…

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February 5th, 2016

Thanktuary - the stress-free social network

(This is something I wanted to build a few years ago. Unfortunately it never materialized. I still think it's a cool idea!) What's wrong with Facebook, Twitter, etc? Thanktuary appreciates the value social networks have brought to the world, but wants to address the following problems they have Too much content It's not unusual for an average social network user to be exposed to hundreds of status updates each day. It takes a lot of time and energy to filter out interesting information. It's easy to feel afraid of missing out. Unlimited activity You can always add another status update, comment, or upload another photo. Most people have several hundred contacts, and are trying to attract…

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January 28th, 2016

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End (Atul Gawande, 2014)

"Being Mortal" is a book by surgeon Atul Gawande about the modern experience of mortality. Triggered by the death of his father and enriched with his vast medical experience, he reminds us that the role of medicine is not primarily to ensure health and survival, but to enable well-being and serve the larger aims of a person's life. In today's world, old age is not uncommon, but it's a quite recent phenomenon. In traditional societies, a person's status rose with age: sustained by their families, the elderly were at the center of attention and had the freedom to live a life that was true to themselves and allowed them to make their own choices until the end. Nowadays people are getting…

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January 10th, 2016

Refuse to choose (Barbara Sher, 2015)

Barbara Sher is a career coach with a focus on goal achievement. She has coined the term scanner for a certain personality type. A scanner is a person with an unusually wide range of interests and curiosity in unrelated subjects, and a low tolerance for boredom. Maybe you too have asked yourselves this question I know I should focus on one thing, but which one? Refuse to choose is her self-help book for people of that personality type, and introduces a model of various scanner types and individual programs and career options for each type. Her style is not at all scientific, but rooted in decade-long experience and intuition, which might be a turn-off for some. Not me though, I'm a believer…

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March 5th, 2015

Schwarmdumm (Gunter Dueck, 2015) - Swarm Stupidity

Win my physical copy of the book by tweeting about this article, just retweet this tweet. I will draw a winner on Wednesday, March 11th and send the book to the winner free of charge! The winner has been drawn and the book has been sent! (This review is about a book unfortunately unavailable in the english language.) Nowadays, swarm intelligence seems to be the default expectation imposed on people working together - the group should naturally be smarter than the sum of its individuals. It's refreshing that Gunter Dueck's latest work is not on this over-hyped phenomenon, but it's ugly cousin, swarm stupidity, where a group is counter-intuitively less intelligent than its members combined.…

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